antimony (antimony) wrote,
antimony
antimony

A.E Housman was a what?

Theory_girl and Kyrademon came over for Buffy, and reminded me why I was once, and still have pretensions of being, a classicist. And a fan of Tom Stoppard, although not as big of a fan as some people I know. (I didn't know that Kyrademon was a big fan, although I should have guessed, being professionally in theatre and all.)

So I went poking around the web in hopes of finding a copy of A.E. Housman's "Fragment of a Greek Tragedy" that had a pseudo-"greek original" alongside the sillyness. I could have sworn I'd seen such a version, but maybe I'm completely insane. All the online versions I found were in plain html, though, which could explain the omission. (And if you find it in betacode, playtest^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H transliterate it back, pretty please?)

I then spent quite a while looking for translations of Catullus, finding mostly commentary. I should ask Fractal to dig out Catullus's (ack, the pseudonym and the subject matter collide. who'da thunk it. er, now I'm being rather obscure. nevermind.) series of three translations of a single one of Gaius Valerius Catullus's poems.

I miss the classics, if it's not obvious. Latin, even more than Greek, since it was longer ago that I left it. (And it had saner grammar/vocab.) Maybe someday I'll find a way to take classics classes again. Over break, I read a fantasy-fairytale novel called Tam Lin, which caught my eye with its cover, then almost lost it with the college-setting and the fairytale-ness (I'm usually not a huge fan of modernized fairytales), but regained my attention when a quick perusal of the first page revealed a mention of Chase and Phillip's intro greek textbook. (All in all, it was an amusing read, although, like most modernized-fairytales, the pacing seemed strange to me.)

Of course, I could just scratch that itch by reading some more Stoppard plays, flipping through one of the three epics in translation and grumbling about how the original was better. Or I could put on my O Brother Where Art Thou soundtrack and try to read Ulysses. (Note: anyone have any recommendations for commentaries on Ulysses? I've never read it, but I'd like to, and I'd really like to do so with a detailed commentary, since I'm woefully ignorant of the relevant Irish history/culture/etc., even if the classical allusions are transparent.)

Good night, children. Sleep men tight, and de don't let the bed bugs bite.
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